Juke Joint?

Juke Joint CrossFit is a box where CrossFitters, weightlifters and music lovers socialize, have fun and become a family while staying in shape. We’re all here to wod and be strong but we also like to have fun. Come enjoy coffee and music. Lift some weight, play guitar, banjo and harmonica.

Juke joint (or jook joint) is the vernacular term for an informal establishment featuring music, dancing, gambling, and drinking, primarily operated by African American people in the southeastern United States. The term “juke” is believed to derive from the Gullah word joog, meaning rowdy or disorderly. A juke joint may also be called a “barrelhouse“.

BluesJukeJoint

…Jooks occurred on plantations, and classic juke joints found, for example, at rural crossroads began to emerge after the Emancipation Proclamation. Dancing was done to so-called jigs and reels (terms routinely used for any dance that struck respectable people as wild or unrestrained, whether Irish or African), to music now thought of as “old-timey” or “hillbilly”. Through the first years of the twentieth century, the fiddle was by far the most popular instrument among both white and black Southern musicians. The banjo was popular before guitars became widely available in the 1890s.

Plentus_SnatchPR12

Juke joint music began with the black folk rags (“ragtime stuff” and “folk rags” are a catch-all term for older African American music) and then the boogie woogie dance music of the late 1880s or 1890s and became the blues, barrel house, and the slow drag dance music of the rural south (moving to Chicago’s black rent-party circuit in the Great Migration) often “raucous and raunchy” good time secular music. Dance forms evolved from ring dances to solo and couples dancing. Some blacks, those seeking white approval, opposed the amorality of the raucous “jook crowd”.

From Wikipedia

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s